The Entire Disney Library Will Be Included on The Disney+ Streaming Service

If you weren’t planning on subscribing to the Disney+ Streaming Service after they announced that Star Wars and Marvel shows would be a mainstay on the platform, then you certainly will be signing up now.

According to CNBC, Disney CEO Bob Iger revealed in an investors meeting today that they would eventually, “put its entire motion picture library on the service, including movies that have traditionally been kept in its archives.” This means Disney will open the floodgates and allow viewers to see what is normally kept in the “Disney Vault.”

For those not aware of the “Disney Vault,” it was a marketing strategy implemented by Disney to drum up home video sales. A Disney movie would be released on home video then after a few months the company would stop printing new copies and seal it away in the “vault.” They would stop creating new copies for years at a time, then would make a big deal about opening the vault for a particular movie for a new home video “release.” For example, just this past week the “Signature Edition” for Disney’s The Little Mermaid was just released on Blu-ray after six years of not being in circulation since the “Diamond Edition” was released in 2013.

This is a huge selling point for the Disney+ service, especially if there is a particular movie that you haven’t seen in years and have not been able to find anywhere. In my case, its Disney’s animated 101 Dalmatians. I have been wanting to see this movie for months and have been unable to find a copy anywhere or find it on any streaming service. So to get my fix I would have to subscribe to Disney+.

Continue reading “The Entire Disney Library Will Be Included on The Disney+ Streaming Service”

Steven Spielberg Hates Netflix

For the last few years Netflix indie films have been strong contenders at the Academy Awards.  Alfonso Cuarón‘s Roma cleaned up at the Oscars this year winning Best Foreign Film, Best Director, Best Cinematography and was nominated for Best Picture. In previous years there were many nominations in many Oscar categories for Netflix’s The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, Mudbound, and 13th. However, if Steven Spielberg has his way there will be no more Netflix movies allowed to contend for Academy Award positions.

According to a report put out by IndieWire Spielberg will be putting forth a motion this week at the annual post-Oscar meeting that would keep Netflix films from qualifying for an Academy Award.

“Steven feels strongly about the difference between the streaming and theatrical situation,” an Amblin spokesperson told IndieWire. “He’ll be happy if the others will join [his campaign] when that comes up [at the Academy Board of Governors meeting]. He will see what happens.”

While the legendary filmmaker is a three-time Oscar winner, he is holding on to a viewpoint that is very much of the past.

His efforts have sparked concern among many in the industry, including Ava DuVernay, who earned an Oscar nomination for the 2017 directing category for Netflix’s prison reform documentary 13th.

She expressed her concerns in a tweeted on Friday urging the Board of Governors to read statements from directors like her on the matter.

Netflix spent heavily on its awards season campaigns this year for Roma, The Ballad of Buster Scruggs and the short End Game. Spielberg and others who fall on his side of the argument claim that Netflix’s ability to spend what they do in campaigning for their nominations is unfair to films not tied to a streaming service.

This is not the end of this debate. It may be a hot-button topic for many years to come. However, if Spielberg has his way there will not be any more Netflix films allowed to compete – like Roma.

What do you think of this? Should Netflix films be allowed to compete for Oscars? Or do you agree with Steven Spielberg? Leave a comment below and let’s make a discussion out of it.

Paramount selling off ‘Cloverfield’ sequel to Netflix

Looks like we may just have to wait a little longer for the next sequel to Cloverfield, sorry Cloverfield fans.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Netflix is in talks with Paramount to acquire the sci-fi movie formerly known as The God Particle.  Meaning that the film may not see a theatrical release, which was supposed to be April of this year.

Up to this point, Paramount has produced and released two Cloverfield films and both were very profitable for the company.  Cloverfield was released in 2008 and grossed over $80 Million domestically on a $25 million budget.  The next film in line, 10 Cloverfield Lane, which came out in 2016, cost even less to make and pulled in $72 million domestically.   

So, with profitability like that, why are they thinking of selling their third movie in the Cloverfield trilogy to a streaming service?

My guess is that there’s some trouble behind the scenes. Continue reading “Paramount selling off ‘Cloverfield’ sequel to Netflix”